Alexis and the RAIN Smart House: Chapter 6

This post is the sixth in a series about how Alexis is working towards a RAIN Smart Home.

by Daniel Jordan, RAIN Program Volunteer

For Alexis Motuz, what began with a knock on the door on a sweltering summer afternoon, became a project to better her home, her neighbourhood, and the environment. Now, as it nears completion, she can feel the pride of owning a RAIN Smart home. She has turned rainwater, that used to run off her property, into an asset that can be used to beautify her own yard.

How does Alexis feel about the overall project? Was it worth it? What recommendations would she give to someone who is thinking about making their own home RAIN Smart?

Alexis Motuz at RAIN Smart Home

Alexis:

Overall, I am very happy with the project and with the way things turned out. I definitely had some apprehension at the beginning – both about the changes to the yard and about finding the right people to do the work. But as the project progressed, and I worked with the RAIN Coach and others from Reep Green Solutions to trouble-shoot, plan, and re-plan, I was happy with the final product.

What a difference already! The apple tree was in full bloom this year for the first time since it was planted, and people in the neighbourhood have been stopping by to see the work that has been done. I was able to give away hundreds of strawberry plants to different neighbours so they can start their own patches and I have heard from each of them that they have bloomed.

I was also nominated for a Kitchener in Bloom award, which was very exciting!

The project has allowed me to meet neighbours I did not already know, I’ve had lots of opportunities to tell them about the RAIN Smart Neighbourhood project and how they can implement the three principles of stormwater management – Slow it down, Soak it up, Keep it clean.

The project took eight months from start to finish. A lot of that time was spent planning and organizing. Once we broke ground, it only took about four weeks to get to this point. It wasn’t difficult, but it was definitely an investment of time to plan it out and to make sure it all went smoothly. In the end, the yard will be a lot less maintenance than it had been, and the kids love their new play spaces–both intentional spaces created for them and a mulch patch which they quickly claimed as their new sandbox!

I’m especially excited to spend less time watering the garden thanks to the large cistern and gravity fed drip irrigation system installed. They free up a couple hours on summer evenings that I spent watering my gardens. Finally, the yard is much more beautiful than it was and my driveway is grateful for not having to handle the run off from the downspouts. It is also nice to know that the rainwater is not carrying pollution into the storm sewer; it is either being used to water the garden or it is being filtered by the ground and going right back into the water table.

For my Mount Hope neighbours and people living in Kitchener’s Lakeside neighbourhood who are planning storm water reduction measures in their yard, I would recommend using Reep Green Solutions’ RAIN Coach and to take advantage of the financial incentives available.

And, when you’re in the middle of the project, to remember that it will be worth it in the end!

Gravity Fed Drip Irrigation

Rain barrels and cisterns can be used as sources for gravity fed drip irrigation of plants, trees, and gardens. Drip irrigation is not suitable for lawns, but is great for plants that don’t like to get their foliage wet.

Drip irrigation consists of a main water line, usually about a half-inch hose, with smaller quarter-inch drip lines running off perpendicular to the main line. The drip lines have small holes punctured in them which will slowly release the water onto the vegetation. Normal drip irrigation lines are designed to have a constant water pressure of between 15-30 psi. Unfortunately, with gravity-fed drip lines, the pressure is often much less.

There is a gain of .433 psi for every foot of elevation your water source is above the drip lines. This means that to achieve the recommended pressure you would need to have your water source approximately 35 feet above the vegetation you want to irrigate.

While this height is likely not achievable or reasonable, it is still possible to use a gravity fed irrigation system, as long as one is willing to accept a slower and less consistent rate of irrigation.

Regardless of the watering system you decide upon, elevating your rain barrel on a stand, such as the one Alexis built, will help provide additional water pressure. It also makes it easier to fit a watering can under the barrel’s outflow if you choose to use the water that way.

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